Monday, 17 June 2019

A Family of Strangers



Author
: Emilie Richards
Genre: Contemporary Fiction, Mystery
Type: Trade Paperback
Pages: 496
Source: TLC Book Tours
Publisher: Mira Books
First Published: June 25, 2019
Opening Lines: "What do alligator's dream about?"


Book Description from GoodReads: Could a lifetime of memories...be a lifetime of lies? All her life Ryan Gracey watched her perfect older sister from afar. Knowing she could never top Wendy's achievements, she didn't even try. Instead Ryan forged her own path while her family barely seemed to notice. Now Wendy shares two little girls with her perfect husband while Ryan mourns the man she lost after a nearly fatal mistake in judgment. The sisters' choices have taken them in different directions, which is why Ryan is stunned when Wendy calls, begging for her help. There's been a murder--and Wendy believes she'll be wrongfully accused. 

While Wendy lies low, Ryan moves back to their hometown to care for the nieces she hardly knows. The sleuthing skills she's refined as a true-crime podcaster quickly rise to the surface as she digs for answers with the help of an unexpected ally. Yet the trail of clues Wendy's left behind lead to nothing but questions. Blood may be thicker than water, but what does Ryan owe a sister who, with every revelation, becomes more and more a stranger? Is Wendy, who always seemed so perfect, just a perfect liar--or worse?

My Rating: 3 stars

My Review: This domestic drama features a dysfunctional family (who has loads of baggage), a mystery and a budding romance. I like books that have a few focuses but for this book, I was in it for the mystery surrounding Ryan's missing sister.  

There were parts of the story that were interesting, and I found myself much more invested in Ryan's relationships with her nieces than I would have thought. There are some interesting characters and a good premise, but this is a much lighter read than I was expecting with the mystery, surprisingly, playing second fiddle to the other aspects of the story. Unfortunately, I guessed one of the big reveals very early on which didn't bode well for the suspense I was expecting.

I enjoyed the easy-going writing style and the humour that's sprinkled into the dialogue but felt I would have enjoyed this book a lot more if it had had a hearty edit. The story often rambles and is filled with superfluous descriptions that bog down the plot. I tended to skim these passages in search of the mystery and tension.

The book is touted as a mystery about Ryan's missing sister, but it feels like the book focuses more on a couple renewing a romance and Ryan learning how to parent her nieces. Cool Aunt points will be awarded, and, at times, the book was touching, but it doesn't make for the anticipated tension-filled read. Overall, this was a decent read for readers looking for a lighter read about a family in turmoil - in more ways than one.

Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to Mira Books and TLC Book Tours for a complimentary advanced copy of this title in exchange for my honest review.

Thursday, 13 June 2019

Dawn on a Distant Shore (Audiobook)


Author: Sara Donati
Genre: Historical Fiction, Saga
Type: e-audiobook
Source: Audible.ca
Narrator: Kate Reading
Length: 20 hours, 2 minutes
Series: #2 in the Into the Wilderness series
Publisher: Random House Audio
First Published in Paper: 2001
Opening Lines: "My Lord, Allow me to report success: at long last I have located the man I believe to be your cousin. He is known as Dan'l Bonner, called Hawkeye by his associates, Indian and White."

Book Description from GoodReadsElizabeth and Nathaniel Bonner have settled into their life together at the edge of the New York wilderness in the winter of 1794. Soon word reaches them that Nathaniel's father has been arrested by crown officials in British Canada. Nathaniel sets out, determined to see his father freed. Instead, Nathaniel is imprisoned and finds himself in danger of being hanged as a spy. Elizabeth soon discovers that freeing Nathaniel will take every ounce of her courage and inventiveness. Torn apart, the Bonners must embark on another voyage...this time to the heart of Scotland where a wealthy Earl claims kinship with Nathaniel's father. With this journey, a whole new world opens up to Nathaniel and Elizabeth - and a destiny they could never have imagined awaits them.

My Rating: 4 stars

My Review: The Into the Wilderness series is one of my all-time favourite sagas. Filled with adventure, romance and family drama, Donati has written an engaging story that pulls readers into the lives of the Bonner family as they experience the tumultuous issues influencing 18th century North America. 

While I liked that this book takes Elizabeth and Nathaniel on a wee bit of an adventure, this wasn't my favourite book in the series. Still a great read but I think I prefer it when more of the secondary characters, namely those at Lake in the Clouds and small-town Paradise, are included in the story lines. When you start to miss characters, you know you've got a good read.

Kate Reading narrates this audiobook and does a phenomenal job. A narrator can make or break an audiobook and Reading is one of the best. She easily bounces back and forth between the characters and includes several different well-done accents, making the story and its characters quite vivid for the listener.

Fans of Outlander will particularly enjoy this series. It has a similarly addictive story and main couple and you'll find yourself immersed in the Bonner clan. What it doesn't have is the frustrating wordiness that Outlander is known for. If you can get your hands on copies of this series (sadly, they are no longer in print for paper editions!), I highly suggest diving into this memorable series.

Tuesday, 11 June 2019

The Last Resort


Author: Marissa Stapley
Genre: Contemporary Fiction, Suspense, Canadian
Type: e-book
Source: NetGalley
Publisher: Graydon House
First Published: June 18, 2019
Opening Lines: "He struggles to breathe. There's blood trickling into one of his eyes. His glasses are gone. He can hear the ocean rising to meet him. It wasn't supposed to be like this."

Book Description from GoodReads: The Harmony Resort promises hope for struggling marriages. Run by celebrity power couple Drs. Miles and Grace Markell, the "last resort" offers a chance for partners to repair their relationships in a luxurious setting on the gorgeous Mayan Riviera.

Johanna and Ben have a marriage that looks perfect on the surface, but in reality, they don’t know each other at all. Shell and Colin fight constantly: after all, Colin is a workaholic, and Shell always comes second to his job as an executive at a powerful mining company. But what has really torn them apart is too devastating to talk about. When both couples begin Harmony's intensive therapy program, it becomes clear that Harmony is not all it seems—and neither are Miles and Grace themselves. What are they hiding, and what price will these couples pay for finding out?

As a deadly tropical storm descends on the coast, trapping the hosts and the guests on the resort, secrets are revealed, loyalties are tested and not one single person—or their marriage—will remain unchanged by what follows.


My Rating: 4 stars

My Review: The Last Resort is a character-driven story that focuses on the crumbling relationships of several couples who attend a two week relationship boot camp at a secluded, luxury resort in the Mayan Riviera in a last ditch attempt to save their failing marriages. The retreat is lead by powerhouse couple, Miles and Grace Markell, who appear to have the perfect relationship themselves. But as the days progress, the struggling couples end up getting much more than they bargained for when unorthodox therapy methods and an impending tropical storm unearth secrets, deceptions and manipulations leading to a tension-filled ending. 


This was a well-paced story (which I read in less than a day) that engaged me throughout with a solid plot, interesting characters, a great baddie readers will love to hate and an enjoyable Big Little Lies vibe. The only issue I had was that the format took a bit of getting used to. It blends different points of view with celebrity news releases and an interview between an unidentified man and woman. Why this format was used becomes clear to readers towards the end but initially I found it a little confusing. 

Overall, this was an entertaining read filled with deceit, secrets and an exciting whodunnit. With its beautiful tropical setting, The Last Resort would make an excellent holiday or summer read. 

Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to Graydon House via NetGalley for providing me with a complimentary digital copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Saturday, 8 June 2019

The Lightkeeper's Daughters



Author: Jean E. Pendziwol
Genre: Historical Fiction, Canadian
Type: Hardcover
Pages: 320
Source: Local Public Library
Publisher: Harper Collins
First Published: July 4, 2017
Opening Lines: "The black Lab is aging. His arthritic legs stiffly pick their way along the well-worn path, stepping carefully over roots and carrying his stout form between the trunks of spruce and poplar."

Book Description from GoodReads: Though her mind is still sharp, Elizabeth's eyes have failed. No longer able to linger over her beloved books or gaze at the paintings that move her spirit, she fills the void with music and memories of her family—a past that suddenly becomes all too present when her late father's journals are found amid the ruins of an old shipwreck.

With the help of Morgan, a delinquent teenager performing community service, Elizabeth goes through the diaries, a journey through time that brings the two women closer together. Entry by entry, these unlikely friends are drawn deep into a world far removed from their own—to Porphyry Island on Lake Superior, where Elizabeth’s father manned the lighthouse seventy years before.

As the words on these musty pages come alive, Elizabeth and Morgan begin to realize that their fates are connected to the isolated island in ways they never dreamed. While the discovery of Morgan's connection sheds light onto her own family mysteries, the faded pages of the journals hold more questions than answers for Elizabeth, and threaten the very core of who she is.

My Rating
: 2.5 stars

My Review: This atmospheric read brings readers to the north end of Lake Superior - a beautiful part of Canada that is described in great detail for the reader. This is a story about a long-hidden secret surrounding the daughters of a lighthouse keeper which is told via two different time frames.

This book received a lot of praise from other readers and had an interesting premise but didn't live up to its hype for me. Lake Superior herself was my favourite character while the human characters felt contrived as did the coincidences within the slow-moving plot that felt too convenient to be believable. I'm sad to say I skimmed much of the last half of the book when the plot became unnecessarily complicated and convoluted leading to a revelation that was lackluster.

Unfortunately, I never felt absorbed into the plot or its characters. My review goes against the general grain of reviews so while this wasn't a good pick for me, I think this may be better for readers who enjoyed The Light Between Oceans.


Thursday, 6 June 2019

The Bride Test


Author: Helen Hoang
Genre: Romance
Type: Trade Paperback
Pages: 296
Source: Local Public Library & GoodReads Giveaway
Series: #2 in the Kiss Quotient series
Publisher: Berkley
First Published: May 7, 2019
Opening Lines: "Khai was supposed to be crying. He knew he was supposed to be crying. Everyone else was. But his eyes were dry."

Book Description from GoodReadsKhai Diep has no feelings. Well, he feels irritation when people move his things or contentment when ledgers balance down to the penny, but not big, important emotions—like grief. And love. He thinks he’s defective. His family knows better—that his autism means he just processes emotions differently. When he steadfastly avoids relationships, his mother takes matters into her own hands and returns to Vietnam to find him the perfect bride.

As a mixed-race girl living in the slums of Ho Chi Minh City, Esme Tran has always felt out of place. When the opportunity arises to come to America and meet a potential husband, she can’t turn it down, thinking this could be the break her family needs. Seducing Khai, however, doesn’t go as planned. Esme’s lessons in love seem to be working…but only on herself. She’s hopelessly smitten with a man who’s convinced he can never return her affection.

With Esme’s time in the United States dwindling, Khai is forced to understand he’s been wrong all along. And there’s more than one way to love.

My Rating: 3.5 stars

My Review: A few months ago I read The Kiss Quotient and even though I'm not a romance buff, I adored it. Sweet with a hearty dose of make-me-blush sexy sassiness! Things got hot-hot-hot but it was the connection of the characters, and a story centred around an autistic main character, that made that book for me.

The Bride Test is the second book in the Kiss Quotient series but can easily be read as a standalone. It also features an autistic main character but this time it's a male character, Khai Diep and it's his love life and family connections that are the focus of the book.

This is a sweet, engaging story but I'll admit that I felt less of a connection to Khai and Esme and struggled to feel their chemistry. I enjoyed Esme's quiet strength and perseverance but the way she blended into American culture so seamlessly and quickly felt contrived.

There are some strong secondary character - namely Khai's mom and brother, Quan (* silently hoping he's the focus of the upcoming third book*) to round out the cast and fans of the first book will get all atwitter (like I did) at the mere mention of Stella and Michael (the main characters of The Kiss Quotient) in one scene.

This is an enjoyable read and while Khai and Esme didn't quite have the magic I had expected, this is an entertaining romance that would make an excellent summer read. I also applaud the author for writing stories featuring an underrepresented group of people and showing that not all people on the autism spectrum are the same.


Monday, 3 June 2019

Mrs. Everything


Author: Jennifer Weiner
Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Type: Trade Paperback
Pages: 464
Source: Publisher
Publisher: Atria Books
First Published: June 11, 2019
Opening Lines: "Her cell phone rang as they were on their way out of the movies. Jo let the crowd sweep her along, out of the dark theater and into the brighter lobby, smelling popcorn and the winter air on people's coats, blinking in the late-afternoon sunshine that came through the dusty windows. She pulled the phone out of her pocket. "Hello?"'

Book Description from GoodReadsFrom Jennifer Weiner, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Who Do You Love and In Her Shoes, comes a smart, thoughtful, and timely exploration of two sisters’ lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places—and be true to themselves—in a rapidly evolving world. Mrs. Everything is an ambitious, richly textured journey through history—and herstory—as these two sisters navigate a changing America over the course of their lives.

My Rating: 4.5 stars

My Review: I think every woman will find a bit of herself in this book. With story lines that focus on the good, the not-so-good and the wonderful aspects of being a woman, Mrs. Everything contains voices of mothers, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, aunts and partners and weaves in issues that women can relate to in varying degrees. 

This is a lengthy novel that spans decades and follows the lives of two sisters, Jo and Bethie. Through their stories, Weiner addresses many issues that women faced in the past, the issues we have in the present and as well as those that may continue to affect the future of women. She hits on emotional topics through the changing decades and blends them into a story that will captivate readers as we tag along on the bumpy journey of these two women as they figure out who they are on their own and together as sisters. 
  
This is a hearty read at 464 pages and, I'll admit, it felt like it dragged a bit at times. But it's this length that allows Weiner to dig deeper into important issues and show how they reverberate through the sisters' lives - issues that include women's roles within family and society as well as our continued struggle for the right to choose what happens to our own bodies. Through Jo and Bethie, Weiner discusses topics that were important to the women who came before us, to the women we are now and hopefully will embolden society to bring much needed change as we work to transform a world that lifts up and encourages the daughters we're raising today. 

This is a powerful story that will run readers through a spectrum of emotions. You'll cry, laugh, feel frustrated and empowered as you read this story about two sisters and their journey to find fulfillment, love and acceptance as women in complicated and ever-changing times.

Note: I highly recommend that readers read Weiner's forward which describes where her inspiration for this story began.

Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to Atria Books for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Saturday, 1 June 2019

The Night Olivia Fell


Author: Christina McDonald
Genre: Suspense
Type: Trade Paperback
Pages: 368
Source: Local Public Library
Publisher: Gallery Books
First Published: February 5, 2019
Opening Lines: "You want the truth? I'm --" My admission was cut off by a streak of blazing hot pain as something exploded against the side of my head. My brain barely registered the blow, my vision a dusky blur of red, pain searing into my skull and down my jaw."

Book Description from GoodReads: In the vein of Big Little Lies and Reconstructing Amelia comes an emotionally charged domestic suspense novel about a mother unraveling the truth behind how her daughter became brain dead. And pregnant.

A search for the truth. A lifetime of lies.

In the small hours of the morning, Abi Knight is startled awake by the phone call no mother ever wants to get: her teenage daughter Olivia has fallen off a bridge. Not only is Olivia brain dead, she’s pregnant and must remain on life support to keep her baby alive. And then Abi sees the angry bruises circling Olivia’s wrists.

When the police unexpectedly rule Olivia’s fall an accident, Abi decides to find out what really happened that night. Heartbroken and grieving, she unravels the threads of her daughter’s life. Was Olivia’s fall an accident? Or something far more sinister?

Christina McDonald weaves a suspenseful and heartwrenching tale of hidden relationships, devastating lies, and the power of a mother’s love. With flashbacks of Olivia’s own resolve to uncover family secrets, this taut and emotional novel asks: how well do you know your children? And how well do they know you? In the vein of Big Little Lies and Reconstructing Amelia comes an emotionally charged domestic suspense novel about a mother unraveling the truth behind how her daughter became brain dead. And pregnant.

A search for the truth. A lifetime of lies.

In the small hours of the morning, Abi Knight is startled awake by the phone call no mother ever wants to get: her teenage daughter Olivia has fallen off a bridge. Not only is Olivia brain dead, she’s pregnant and must remain on life support to keep her baby alive. And then Abi sees the angry bruises circling Olivia’s wrists.

When the police unexpectedly rule Olivia’s fall an accident, Abi decides to find out what really happened that night. Heartbroken and grieving, she unravels the threads of her daughter’s life. Was Olivia’s fall an accident? Or something far more sinister?

Christina McDonald weaves a suspenseful and heart wrenching tale of hidden relationships, devastating lies, and the power of a mother’s love. With flashbacks of Olivia’s own resolve to uncover family secrets, this taut and emotional novel asks: how well do you know your children? And how well do they know you? Christina McDonald weaves a suspenseful and heart wrenching tale of hidden relationships, devastating lies, and the power of a mother’s love. With flashbacks of Olivia’s own resolve to uncover family secrets, this taut and emotional novel asks: how well do you know your children? And how well do they know you? Christina McDonald weaves a suspenseful and heart-wrenching tale of hidden relationships, devastating lies, and the power of a mother’s love. With flashbacks of Olivia’s own resolve to uncover family secrets, this taut and emotional novel asks: how well do you know your children? And how well do they know you?



My Rating: 2.5 stars

My Review: The Night Olivia Fell has a wonderfully eerie cover and the story starts off with a bang but it just wasn't a good pick for this avid suspense reader. It's touted as a suspense novel but quickly veers into the family melodrama domain and generally lacked the tension I expect from a thriller. 

The plot loses its initial momentum and gains inconsistencies while the culprit becomes obvious (for this suspense reader, anyway). When you add in one-dimensional characters and too much time spent on dialogue that felt amateurish and long-winded, I felt a little jilted not getting the edge-of-my-seat read I had expected.

This was a quick read and it held my interest enough for me to want to finish it (hoping for a suspenseful Hail Mary) but ultimately, I was disappointed. It lacked suspense, characters I could connect with and had too much of a Hallmark movie-of-the-week feel. With more depth to its characters, better dialogue and increased tension, this would have garnered a higher rating from me.  

Thursday, 30 May 2019

Review & Giveaway: The Woman in the White Kimono


Author: Ana Johns
Genre: Historical Fiction (Japan)
Type: Trade Paperback
Pages: 352
Source: TLC Book Tour
Publisher: Park Row Books
First Published: May 28, 2019
Opening Lines: "My given name is Naoko Nakamura. My married name is Naoko Tanaka. And once, for a short time in between, it was something else -- a nontraditional name from an unconventional wedding ceremony held under an ancient tree of flickering lights."

Book Description from GoodReadsOceans and decades apart, two women are inextricably bound by the secrets between them.

Japan, 1957. Seventeen-year-old Naoko Nakamura’s prearranged marriage to the son of her father’s business associate would secure her family’s status in their traditional Japanese community, but Naoko has fallen for another man—an American sailor, a gaijin—and to marry him would bring great shame upon her entire family. When it’s learned Naoko carries the sailor’s child, she’s cast out in disgrace and forced to make unimaginable choices with consequences that will ripple across generations.

America, present day. Tori Kovac, caring for her dying father, finds a letter containing a shocking revelation—one that calls into question everything she understood about him, her family and herself. Setting out to learn the truth behind the letter, Tori’s journey leads her halfway around the world to a remote seaside village in Japan, where she must confront the demons of the past to pave a way for redemption.


In breathtaking prose and inspired by true stories from a devastating and little-known era in Japanese and American history, The Woman in the White Kimono illuminates a searing portrait of one woman torn between her culture and her heart, and another woman on a journey to discover the true meaning of home.

My Rating: 3.5 stars

My Review: This debut Historical Fiction novel takes readers into the lives of two women - Naoko Nakamura, a Japanese young woman in the 1950's and Tori Kovac, an American woman in present day who unearths secrets from her father's past. Through these two characters, Johns explores Japanese culture, interracial marriage, prejudice and the pressure to meet traditional Japanese cultural ideals.

Johns has written a heart wrenching story set during and after WWII. Descriptions of Japan are detailed for the reader, but the focus of the story is on the desperation of Naoko as she tries to balance the intricacies forbidden love with the Japanese culture that her traditional family staunchly abides. A large portion of the book focuses on how some Japanese women were treated by American soldiers and the sometimes horrific repercussions that followed.

Ana Johns has solid writing skills and for a debut, this story is quite strong. While the story was very slow moving and her character development could have been a bit stronger, I appreciate that she tackles big issues, emotional scenes, adds a couple of twists and provides readers with an interesting aspect of post-WWII.  This is an author to keep an eye on. I look forward to reading her future work.

Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to Park Row Books and TLC Book Tours for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. 


Giveaway!

Park Row Books and TLC Book Tours have graciously provided me with one copy of The Woman in the White Kimono to giveaway to one of my blog readers!  

** Canadian and US only **

a Rafflecopter giveaway





Tuesday, 28 May 2019

Sweety


Author: Andrea Zuill
Genre: Picture Book, Children's
Type: Hardcover
Source: Local Public Library
Publisher: Random House / Swartz and Wade
First Published: March 26, 2019
Opening Lines: "Sweety was awkward. Even for a naked mole rat."

Book Description from GoodReadsFrom the author of WOLF CAMP comes the story of a charming, mushroom-loving, headgear-wearing, totally awkward naked mole rat who is looking for like-minded peeps.

Sweety is awkward, even for a naked mole rat. She has protruding front teeth, thick glasses, and some very unusual hobbies, including interpretive dance and fungus identification. She's intense and passionate--and her peers don't always get her. But surely there are other mushroom lovers out there? As Sweety sets out to find them, she comes to realize--with a little help from her cool Aunt Ruth-- that being Sweety is actually pretty awesome. With heart and humor and a whole lot of charm, Andrea Zuill delivers a story about learning to embrace everything that makes you you--and that's something many kids are going to relate to.

My Rating: 5 stars

My Review: You guuuuys!! It is ridiculous how enamoured I am with this picture book. It first caught my eye when it was returned at the library where I work, and I have been suggesting it to my young library customers ever since I read it. 

I can now check off 'read a book about an oddball naked mole rat' off my reading to-do list. Phew!  Andrea Zuill has written a charming and inspiring story about a young naked mole rat named Sweety who isn't like her classmates. She's awkward, sometimes intense, wears thick glasses and a headgear retainer and enjoys unusual hobbies and ways to express herself. She likes who she is but doesn't fit in with her peers which sometimes makes her feel lonely.

With beautiful, expressive illustrations, readers will enjoy seeing how Sweety embraces who she is. She encourages kids to be comfortable with who they are and if they stay true to themselves, they'll find others who appreciate them for all their quirky, oddball awesomeness.  

Sweety is one of those children's picture book characters (like Nerdy Birdy) who will stay with me for a long time. I'm crossing my fingers and toes that there will be more picture books featuring this wee character. Sweety is brave, unapologetic about who she is and aptly named. Sweety, you are so very sweet. I get a goofy smile on my face every time I think of her. 


Favourite Quote: "Aunt Ruth said that being different was one of the best things about her life, and that if you stayed true to yourself, you'd find your people."

Monday, 27 May 2019

Call Your Daughter Home


Author: Deb Spera
Genre: Historical Fiction
Type: e-book
Source: NetGalley
Publisher: Harlequin - Park Row Books
First Published: June 11, 2019
Opening Lines: "It's easier to kill a man than a gator, but it takes the same kind of wait. You got to watch for the weakness, and take your shot to the back of the head."

Book Description from GoodReadsA stunning tour de force following three fierce, unforgettable Southern women in the years leading up to the Great Depression.

It's 1924 South Carolina and the region is still recovering from the infamous boll weevil infestation that devastated the land and the economy. Gertrude, a mother of four, must make an unconscionable decision to save her daughters from starvation or die at the hands of an abusive husband. Retta is navigating a harsh world as a first-generation freed slave, still employed by the Coles, influential plantation proprietors who once owned her family. Annie is the matriarch of the Coles family and must come to terms with the terrible truth that has ripped her family apart. These three women seemingly have nothing in common, yet as they unite to stand up to the terrible injustices that have long plagued the small town, they find strength in the bond that ties women together. Told in the pitch-perfect voices of Gertrude, Retta and Annie, Call Your Daughter Home is an audacious, timeless story about the power of family, deep-buried secrets and the ferocity of motherhood.

My Rating: 3.5 stars

My Review: Call Your Daughter Home is a Historical Fiction novel set in 1920's South Carolina in an area which recently suffered a devastating boll weevil infestation leaving cotton crops decimated. Only 50 years since the Civil War, and still a few years away from The Depression, author Deb Spera shows how these issues influence the lives of three women with vastly different backgrounds. 

Reeta, a first-generation freed slave, Annie, a rich business owner and Gertrude, a poor mother of four girls, each take turns narrating the story. Their voices are strong and distinct, allowing them to share their different points of view as women living during this uncertain time as well as illustrate how the men in their lives greatly influence their experiences. Despite their differences in social status, these three women find strength, loyalty and a degree of friendship with each other. 

The book has a slower pace and while the plot was somewhat predictable, readers will find the ending quite satisfying. The inclusion of interesting and varied secondary characters strengthens the story and provides readers with an interesting read that focuses on these three women whose love for their children, despite their differing experiences and hardships, push them onward.

Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with a digital copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

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